← Back to ‘How to Travel the World For Free’

Top 5 cities where the dollar Is strongest
Photo by Teddy James

The dollar gives American travelers an advantage in most foreign countries. As long as there’s green in your bank account, you almost always have a leg up. The dollar is strong, stable and widely recognized as the international business currency. So where does Mr. Washington go the furthest?

We’ve compiled a list of the top 5 cities where the dollar is strongest.

1. London, United Kingdom

Top 5 cities where the dollar Is strongest
Photo by Pedro Szekely

The dollar typically lags behind the pound and the UK frequently finds itself on the “a bit too pricey” list. Recent pound depreciation (largely due to global market concerns following the Brexit movement) has opened up a window for American travelers.

2. Buenos Aires, Argentina

Top 5 cities where the dollar Is strongest

The dollar has a reputation for going far in Argentina. Five-star hotels can be booked for under $80 in Buenos Aires and flight prices are down 10 percent from 2016. Whether it’s shopping in Palmero or sitting down to ceviche at i Latina, the dollar is met with open arms.

3. Cape Town, South Africa

Top 5 cities where the dollar Is strongest
Photo by South African Tourism

Flights have gotten more affordable over the past few years, but the real savings kick in when you hit the ground. The dollar is equivalent to almost 13 rand, compared to 11 in 2015. Whether you’re hiking through Table Mountain National Park or walking along the Victoria and Alfred Waterfront, you can enjoy the best of Cape Town for less than you might imagine.

4. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Top 5 cities where the dollar Is strongest
Photo by Colin Capelle

According to Travel and Leisure’s calculations, the dollar is almost 13 percent stronger in Malaysia than it was in 2016. So checking out the Petronas Towers or making the trip to the eastern coast to island hop, your dollars will open doors.

5. Medellin, Colombia

Top 5 cities where the dollar Is strongest
Photo by Omar Urán

Twenty years ago, a trip to Medellin would come with some very serious security concerns. Today, tourists are more concerned with covering everything on their list of things to see. You can expect prices to be about a third of what they are in the US. You can hop around the city on the metro, take the metro cable up to the hills surrounding the city, check out a museum, and make it out at night to a salsa or reggaeton club for $20 or $30.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.